HIV & AIDS

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a virus that attacks the human immune system. If the virus is untreated, it can severely weaken the body’s defenses, leaving it vulnerable to many infections and cancers that would not normally develop in healthy individuals. Flu-like symptoms can be present 2–4 weeks after infections, but some may never experience any discomfort. Learn more about Hawaii HIV treatment and care services.


How Its Spread: blood semen, vaginal fluids, rectal fluids, and breast milk from an infected person can transmit HIV. Typically this is through anal or vaginal sex, but the sharing of syringes or needles is also a method of transmission.


How It Is NOT Spread: through saliva, sweat, air, water, close-mouth kissing, tears, pets, toilets, sharing meals.


U=U CAMPAIGN

U=U is a new customizable social marketing campaign to educate about U=U and encourage engagement in care. 

Prevention Access Campaign and a community of people living with HIV collaborated with the leading researchers on HIV sexual transmission to answer a fundamental question about living with HIV and having an undetectable viral load: Will I pass on HIV to my sexual partner?  

Prevention Access Campaign and a community of people living with HIV collaborated with the leading researchers on HIV sexual transmission to answer a fundamental question about living with HIV and having an undetectable viral load. Learn more

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a late stage of HIV infection. By the time a diagnosis of AIDS is made, HIV will already have seriously damaged the body’s immune system. Often, a person with an AIDS diagnosis will already have had a life-threatening infection or cancer.

Although there is yet no cure for HIV, treating the virus with antiretroviral medication can prevent the progression of AIDS and even suppress the virus so further transmission to others does not occur.

Data & Statistics, Reporting in Hawai‘i

HIV infections are more common in males (89.5%), in persons aged 25-34 years (34.1%) and 34-45 years (33.1%), in whites (54.5%), and in persons whose infections were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact (71.6%).

At year-end 2016, there were 2,473 persons living with diagnosed HIV infection (PLWDH) in Hawai‘i, resulting in a prevalence rate of PLWDH at 173.1 per 100,000 populations. Honolulu County constituted approximately two thirds of all diagnosed HIV infections (66.5% and 65.5%, respectively), followed by Hawai‘i County (16.8% and 17.6%, respectively).

Get more data on HIV/AIDS in Hawai‘i here.

Additional Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

National Institutes of Health