DOH SAPB and PrEP

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) is a new method to help prevent the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to uninfected people by daily taking a pill. In July 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the once a day, combination pill emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Truvada®) for use as PrEP in adults who did not have HIV and met other criteria for its use.

In May 2014, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) released the first comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for PrEP. These guidelines were developed by a federal inter-agency working group led by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and reflect input from providers, HIV patients, partners and affected communities:

The State of Hawaiʻi Department of Health along with CDC recommends the addition of PrEP for people who are at ongoing substantial risk of HIV infection. PrEP works best against HIV-infection with daily adherence. Because no prevention strategy for sexually active people is 100% effective, patients taking PrEP are encouraged to use other effective prevention strategies to maximally reduce their risk, including:

  • Using condoms consistently and correctly
  • Getting HIV testing with partners
  • Choosing less risky sexual behaviors, such as oral sex
  • For people who inject drugs, getting into drug treatment programs and using sterile equipment. Visit The CHOW Project for more information: http://www.chowproject.org/

We looked to the successful model laid out by the New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute (NYSDOH AI) in the Guidance for the Use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) to Prevent HIV Transmission to ensure inclusion of essential information for providers. Thus, additional useful resources can be found in the following reference:

New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute. New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute (NYSDOH AI), (2014). Guidance for the Use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) To Prevent HIV Transmission. http://www.hivguidelines.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/guidance-for-the-use-of-pre-exposure-prophylaxis-prep-to-prevent-hiv-transmission.pdf

Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) is another HIV prevention method that is different than PrEP and works by taking anti-HIV medications immediately after exposure to HIV, rather than before exposure.  PEP works to reduce the chance of becoming HIV-infected after exposure to the virus by keeping HIV from making copies of itself and spreading through the body.

More information on PEP may be accessed via this link: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/pep.html

Information derived from:

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC, (2014).US Public Health Service Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for the Prevention of HIV Infection in the United States – 2014 A Clinical Practice Guideline. Retrieved from website: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/PrEPguidelines2014.pdf
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC, (2014).US Public Health Service Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for the Prevention of HIV Infection in the United States – 2014 Clinical Providers’ Supplement. Retrieved from website: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/PrEPProviderSupplement2014.pdf
  3. New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute. New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute (NYSDOH AI), (2014). Guidance for the Use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) To Prevent HIV Transmission. Retrieved from website: http://www.hivguidelines.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/PrEP-Guidance_3-27-15.pdf
(1) Persons who think they might have HIV infection, AIDS, or other STDs should not rely on anything in this website to self-diagnose or treat, but should instead consult their physician.
(2) Physicians should not consider this website to be a comprehensive tool for diagnosis or treatment of patients.
(3) The DOH has tried to present accurate information to assist patients and physicians in their determination whether PrEP can be beneficial for individual patient’s use, but makes no warranty about the accuracy or completeness of the information on this website.

Updated September 14, 2015