Chapter 9 Auxiliary Services

   

CHAPTER 9

   

AUXILIARY SERVICES 

   

Auxiliary services are services provided to assist a person with a disability to access a program or service.

   

9.1  Qualified sign language interpreter

   

     

The use of a “qualified interpreter” is probably one of the least understood requirements in communication access.  When an interpreter is necessary, a “qualified” interpreter must be obtained.  Qualification often correlates with certification level, but certification is not a requirement under the Americans with Disabilities Act.  Effective communication is the requirement.  A “qualified interpreter” is an individual who is able to interpret effectively, using any necessary specialized vocabulary.

     

           

  • Refer to ATTACHMENT M for guidelines for utilizing sign language/English interpreters.
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Often, people accompanying a person who is deaf or hard of hearing can provide interpreting services, but a department or agency cannot require a person who is deaf or hard of hearing to provide his or her own interpreter as a prerequisite to participation, because it is the responsibility of the State to provide and pay for a qualified interpreter.  Also, in most situations, it is not appropriate to use a family member or companion as an interpreter because his or her presence at the transaction may violate the individual’s right to confidentiality, or because the friend or family member may have an interest in the transaction that is different from that of the involved person who is deaf.  A person who is deaf has the right to request an impartial interpreter.  The obligation to provide “impartial” interpreting services requires that the department or agency provide an interpreter who does not have a personal relationship to the individual with a disability.  The State may, however, accept the services of a family member or friend or a volunteer, provided communication is effective, impartial, and at the request of the person who is deaf or hard of hearing.

   

   

9.2  Real-time captioning service providers

   

     

Real-time captioners provide simultaneous visible transcription of the speaker’s words and are usually trained court reporters.  Real-time captioning involves the use of a stenographic machine, a computer, real-time captioning.

   

   

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    Disability & Communication Access Board

   

     

software, and a caption encoder for putting the words on a screen.  Real-time captioning services are especially useful for those people who are deaf or hard of hearing who do not use sign language and for large group events or meetings.

     

           

  • Refer to ATTACHMENT N for guidelines on utilizing real-time captioners.
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9.3  Computer-assisted notetakers

   

     

Computer-assisted notetakers (CAN) provide communication access for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.  The CAN facilitates participation at meetings or in classrooms and interaction with other people.  The CAN provides a summary or notes of a speaker’s words typed into a laptop computer and displayed on its screen.

     

           

  • Refer to ATTACHMENT O for guidelines on utilizing computer-assisted notetakers.
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9.4  Auxiliary personnel

   

     

Personal assistants are usually utilized to help a person who has limited mobility or who has a visual impairment.  A personal assistant may perform any of the following functions, depending upon an individual’s specific needs:

     

           

  • provide orientation and mobility assistance for a person who is visually impaired;         
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  • assist with handling books, materials, or other bulky items for someone who is either mobility impaired or visually impaired;         
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  • assist with cutting up food at a meal or carrying a plate at a buffet meal for someone with limited manual dexterity;         
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  • assist with opening doors or reaching for items for someone who is mobility impaired.
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It is usually not necessary to assign a personal assistant on a 1:1 basis for the entire duration of a training activity.  By inquiring in advance of an individual’s needs, one personal assistant will often suffice to meet the needs of several individuals who have disabilities. Assistance with toileting, dressing, or other activities of a personal nature need not be provided.

   

   

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Notetakers are utilized to prepare written notes of information presented.  If an individual has a visual impairment, that person may not be able to see written charts, graphs, or other information that a speaker presents on a blackboard, flip chart, etc.  If an individual has a learning disability, the person may not be able to comprehend or grasp all of the information.  If an individual has a physical disability due to quadriplegia or has limited manual dexterity, the person may simply not be able to write at a speed which is necessary to capture all the information.  In any of these scenarios, a notetaker would then be used to write down information for a person who has a disability.  Of course, any copies of notes, speeches, etc., from a presenter at a conference or workshop which can be given out would minimize the need for notetakers.

   

   

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CHECKLIST FOR ENSURING
      FOR PROVIDING AUXILIARY SERVICES

   

     

       

         

         

         

       

       

         

         

         

       

       

         

         

         

       

       

         

         

         

       

       

         

         

         

       

     

           

YES

         

           

NO

         

 
           

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Appropriate program staff know how to hire a sign language interpreter, appropriate for the situation, if requested.

                           •  Refer to ATTACHMENT M for guidelines for utilizing sign language/English interpreters.

_____
_____

Appropriate program staff know how to hire real-time captioners, appropriate for the situation, if requested.

         

   •  Refer to ATTACHMENT N for guidelines on utilizing real-time captioners.

           

_____

         

_____

Appropriate program staff know how to hire a computer-assisted notetaker, appropriate for the situation, if requested.

         

   •  Refer to ATTACHMENT O for guidelines for utilizing computer-assisted notetakers.

           

_____

         

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Appropriate program staff know how to hire auxiliary personnel, appropriate for the situation, if requested.

   

   

 

             

March 2008                     Chapter 9, Page 3
          Disability & Communication Access Board