Attachment S Information on Site Accessibility

   

     

ATTACHMENT S

     

SITE ACCESSIBILITY

     

This checklist has been prepared to assist you in assessing your site. This survey tool is not a checklist to ensure full compliance with all the design requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines and should not be used to assess facilities undergoing new construction or alterations. It is a guide for program accessibility.

     

The goal of your survey is to identify a facility which can provide for the maximum integration of people who have disabilities into your program, service, or activity. Use this checklist to identify the major accessibility features of the site(s) you are considering and to select between the options you have available.

     

For those areas which are deficient in meeting the design standards, you should make corrections or adaptations. In some instances, alternate solutions using staff, rented equipment, etc., will suffice for the temporary needs of your training activity. In other instances, you may need to select an alternate site.

     

Parking

     

Accessible parking should be available at the site for individuals who have disabilities who drive their own vehicles or are passengers in vehicles driven to the site. Accessible parking should have the following features:

   

   

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

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Stalls reserved for people with disabilities should be visibly marked with the International Symbol of Accessibility.
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There should be accessible parking for a car (8′ wide stall plus 5′ wide access aisle).
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There should be accessible parking for a van (11′ wide stall plus 5′ wide access aisle).
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All accessible parking should be located closest to the nearest accessible entrance.
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All accessible parking should connect to an accessible route to an accessible entrance.

   

     

March 2008                 Attachment S, Page 1
Disability and Communication Access Board

     

If the site does not have accessible parking which meets the above criteria, arrange to designate new stalls or redesign existing stalls. If such arrangements are not possible, valet parking service may be a sufficient alternative, although valet service is very inconvenient for any program, service, or activity other than a conference or workshop where a non-state facility with parking attendants is used.

     

Passenger loading zones

     

The site should have an accessible passenger loading zone to allow drivers to load or unload people with disabilities safely at the site. An accessible passenger loading zone at the site should have the following features:

   

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

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The loading or unloading area should be wide enough to allow a person to exit and enter a vehicle (5′ wide access aisle) without going into traffic.
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The loading zone should be located closest to the nearest accessible entrance and should connect to that entrance on an accessible route.

   

     

If the site does not have an accessible passenger loading zone which meets the above criteria, arrange to designate an area for safe loading and unloading. A designated area should not be a freight or other service delivery area which is not also a regular entrance for the public.

     

Entrance

     

The site must have an entrance which is accessible. This entrance should be the primary entrance of the facility, but may also be a secondary entrance, as long as the entrance is also an entrance for the general public and is not segregated for people who have disabilities. An accessible entrance should have the following features:

   

   

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

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The entrance should be located on an accessible route from the accessible parking stalls and the accessible passenger loading area.
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If the entrance has steps or stairs, there should be a wheelchair lift or a ramp with a slope no greater than 1:12, with handrails on both sides, and 5′ wide and 5′ deep level landing at the top and bottom of the ramp.
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If there are doors which must be manipulated, they should be 32″ wide, have 18″ of clear wall space on the pull side of the door, be easy to open (5 pound force maximum), have door handles no higher than 48″ off the finished floor, be operable with a closed fist, and have thresholds no higher than 1/2″ beveled.
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If the site has multiple entrances, some of which are inaccessible, there should be clear markings at the inaccessible entrances directing people to the accessible entrance.

   

     

March 2008                  Attachment S, Page 2
Disability and Communication Access Board

     

If the site does not have an entrance which meets the above criteria, arrange to create an accessible entrance. An accessible entrance should not be a freight or other service delivery area which is also not a regular entrance for the public.

     

Utilizing staff to open or close the door for a person who has a disability at the site may be a possible alternative to assist with opening doors with inaccessible hardware, push force, etc.

     

Interior routes

     

At least one of all necessary routes which will be used by the people accessing your program, service, or activity should be accessible. These include the routes from the accessible entrance(s) to the program area(s), rest rooms, and other designated program area(s). An accessible interior route should have the following features:

   

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

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The route(s) should provide direct access to all public areas on an accessible path which is at least 36″ wide.
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The route(s) should permit a person using a wheelchair to maneuver and turn around comfortably (5′ circle or T-shaped turnaround space).
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The route(s) should be slip-resistant and, if carpet is used, it should be low-pile and tightly woven.
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The route(s) should be free of protruding objects which cannot be detected by a cane used by a person who is blind. A protruding object is one which extends more than 4″ from the wall with the lower edge higher than 27″ off the floor or hanging lower than 80″ above the floor.
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Route(s) and room(s) should be designated with tactile signage on the latch side of the door.
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If travel is required to multiple floors, there should be an elevator which is large enough to accommodate a person in a wheelchair, with call buttons, panel controls, and emergency phone within reach of a person in a wheelchair (54″ high for a side reach and 48″ high for a forward reach).
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On any level utilized for a program, service, or activity, if there are stairs, there must be an accessible alternate route (e.g., ramp).
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If there are doors which must be manipulated, they should be 32″ wide, have 18″ of clear wall space on the pull side of the door, be easy to open (5 pound force maximum; hardware no higher than 48″ and operable with a closed fist); with thresholds no higher than 1/2″ beveled.

   

     

March 2008                  Attachment S, Page 3
Disability and Communication Access Board

     

Ideally, the layout and circulation pattern should permit people who have disabilities to move throughout all areas without special assistance. Where the facility does not provide full accessibility, assistance or alternative services should be available. However, if there are significant problems with accessibility in the interior route (e.g., steps with no ramp), you should consider an alternate site.

     

Phones and drinking fountains

     

Phones or drinking fountains at the site should be accessible with the following features:

   

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

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If there are drinking fountains, at least one in close proximity to the program, service, or activity should be accessible (spout no higher than 36″ from the floor; controls on the front or the side near the front edge and operable with a closed fist; and clear floor space of 30″ x 48″ in front of the drinking fountain).
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If there are telephones, at least one in close proximity to the program, service, or activity should be accessible to a person in a wheelchair (highest operable part no higher than 48″ with a forward reach or 54″ with a side reach; push button controls; and clear floor space of 30″ x 48″ in front of the telephone).
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If there are telephones, at least one in close proximity to the program, service, or activity should be accessible to people who are deaf or hard of hearing (hearing aid compatibility; volume control identified with signage; and TTY equipped and identified with signage bearing the International TTY Symbol).

   

     

Provision of water with drinking glasses and straws at the table may be a suitable alternative to compensate for an inaccessible drinking fountain. Provision of portable TTYs or accessible desk phones may be a suitable alternative to compensate for an inaccessible phone.

     

March 2008                  Attachment S, Page 4
Disability and Communication Access Board

     

Public restrooms

     

The site should have one accessible public rest room for both men and women (either one for each sex or unisex). Ideally, those rest rooms should be the same ones used by all members of the public located in close proximity to the program, service, or activity. An accessible public rest room should have the following features:

   

   

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

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Accessible toilet facilities should be located on an accessible route.
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If there are doors which must be manipulated, they should be 32″ minimum wide, have 18″ of clear wall space on the pull side of the door, be easy to open (5 pound force maximum; hardware no higher than 48″ and operable with a closed fist); with thresholds no higher than 1/2″ beveled.
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Restrooms should have adequate maneuvering space for a person in a wheelchair (5′ circle or T-shaped turnaround space).
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The door to the accessible stall should be 32″ minimum wide, be easy to open (5 pound force maximum; hardware no higher than 48″ and operable with a closed fist); with door swinging outward.
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The accessible toilet stall should be 5′ x 5′ minimum, clear of the door swing, with the toilet positioned 18″ centerline to the wall, with grab bars behind and on the side wall nearest the toilet, and toilet seat 17″ – 19″ high.
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There should be one lavatory which is accessible (30″ x 48″ clear floor space in front; maximum of 19″ depth under the lavatory; rim no higher than 34″; minimum of 29″ from the floor to the bottom of the lavatory apron; with hardware operable with one closed fist).
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Soap and other dispensers should be mounted 48″ high or less, have 30″ x 48″ clear floor space in front, and be usable with one closed fist.
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Mirror should be mounted with bottom edge of reflecting surface no higher than 40″.
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If the facility has multiple rest rooms, some of which are accessible, there should be clear marking at the inaccessible rest rooms, directing people to the accessible rest rooms.

   

     

Staff may help with opening doors with inaccessible hardware, push force, accessing dispensers, turning water faucets on and off, etc. However, if the accessibility deficiencies are more serious and a person cannot enter the rest room or the accessible stall, you should consider an alternate site.

     

March 2008                  Attachment S, Page 5
Disability and Communication Access Board

     

Meeting rooms

     

Each of the rooms used for your conference, training, or workshop should be accessible for people with disabilities. An accessible meeting room should have the following features:

   

   

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

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If there are doors which must be manipulated, they should be 32″ wide, have 18″ of clear wall space on the pull side of the door, be easy to open (5 pound force maximum; hardware no higher than 48″ and operable with a closed fist); with thresholds no higher than 1/2″ beveled.
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Meeting rooms should have adequate maneuvering space for a person in a wheelchair (5′ circle or T-shaped turnaround space).
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Pathways in the meeting rooms should be at least 36″ wide.
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Tables should have a minimum 27″ clear space, 19″ depth, 30″ width, and tops between 28″ – 34″ in height.

   

     

Guest rooms (for overnight lodging)

     

If your activity is a multi-day event, overnight accommodations for participants should include options for people who have disabilities. An accessible guest room should have the following features:

   

   

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

     

       

       

     

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Doors to the guest room and bathroom should be 32″ wide, have 18″ of clear wall space on the pull side of the door, be easy to open (5 pound force maximum; hardware no higher than 48″ and operable with a closed fist); with thresholds no higher than 1/2″ beveled.
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Guest rooms and bathrooms should have adequate maneuvering space for a person in a wheelchair (5′ circle or T-shaped turnaround space).
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The water closet (toilet seat) should be positioned 18″ centerline to the wall, with grab bars behind and on the side wall nearest the toilet, and toilet seat 17″ – 19″ high.
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The lavatory should have 30″ x 48″ clear floor space in front; maximum of 19″ depth under the lavatory; rim no higher than 34″; minimum of 29″ from the floor to the bottom of the lavatory apron; with hardware operable with one closed fist.
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Soap dispensers, hair dryers, and other accessories should be mounted 48″ high or less, have 30″ x 48″ clear floor space in front, and be usable with one closed fist.
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The tub or shower area should have grab bars provided on the side wall of the tub, a hand-held shower on hose with adjustable height bar, and a clear floor space of 30″ x 48″ in front. A roll-in shower is desirable.
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Mirror should be mounted with the bottom edge of the reflecting surface no higher than 40″.
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Rooms designated for people who are deaf or hard of hearing should have visual alarms, TTYs (in the room or available at the front desk), and closed-captioned decoders.

   

     

                                      

   

        March 2008                 Attachment S, Page 6
Disability and Communication Access Board